Shūgaku-in Rikyū  (修学院離宮)

Shūgaku-in Rikyū is an exception among Kyoto’s imperial gardens. There is not only one garden on its grounds, but three separate gardens. The gardens are connected by gravel paths, which lead through vegetable patches and rice fields. It also never was the official residence of a member of the imperial family – Emperor Gomizuno-o (1596-1680) had built these gardens as a private retreat in the outskirts of Kyoto, on the foot of the Higashiyama, the eastern hills. Additionally, this garden may be the best example of the use of “borrowed landscape”- Shakkei (借景) in Japan.

The retired emperor Gomizuno-o (後水尾天皇) built the gardens between 1653 and 1655 with the financial support of the shogun. More than 600 years earlier, in the Heian period (794-1185), a temple called “Shūgaku-in” stood on this site. Without any actual political power, the emperor had lots of time on his hands to dedicate himself to the study of fine arts, poetry, architecture and design. It is therefore believed that most of the design was his own work. He has already participated in the design process of his official retirement residence Sentō Gosho in 1629, whose main designer was garden master Kobori Enshū. Enshū passed away in 1647, but his influence on emperor Gomizuno-o is still visible in the design of the Shūgaku-in Rikyū gardens.

There are three gardens: The lower garden, the middle garden and the upper garden.
All of them have their own characteristics, but most visitors agree that the upper garden is the most spectacular one – especially in autumn, when the trees of the surrounding mountains turn into a vibrant red, yellow and orange.

Access to the garden is only granted to guided tours (free of charge). You can apply for a tour at the Imperial Household Agency Office in Kyoto (3 Kyoto-gyoen, Kamigyo-ku, Kyoto, 602-8611) or on their website: http://sankan.kunaicho.go.jp/english/guide/shugakuin.html .
A contingent of tickets is available each day from 11 am on a first come first-served basis.

This is eBook is about the Japanese stone lanterns (Ishi-doro) of the Shūgaku-in Rikyū gardens.

Content
Shugaku-in Rikyu
Lower Garden
Stone lantern – Ishi-dōrō (石燈籠)
Kimono-sleeve lantern – Sode-gata tōrō (袖形燈籠)
Alligator’s mouth lantern – Wanikuchi dōrō (鰐口燈籠)
Korean stone lantern – Chōsen-dōrō (朝鮮燈籠)
Middle Garden
Christian lantern – Kirishitan-dōrō (キリシタン燈籠)
Oribe stone lantern (織部燈籠)
Upper Garden
Mountain temple lantern – Yamadera-dōrō (山寺燈籠)
Waterfall viewing lantern – Takimi-dōrō (滝見燈籠)

5 pages with
13 pictures of the stone lanterns of the Shugaku-in Rikyu garden

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Directions

How to get there

The easiest way to get to the Shūgaku-in Imperial Villa is to take the city bus number 5 to the stop Shūgaku-in Rikyu Michi. From there, walk 15 min in eastern direction.

Admission
Free
Only adults over 18 can apply for the tour.

Address
JP: 〒 606-8052 京都府京都市左京区修学院藪添
EN: Shugakuin Yabusoe, Sakyo Ward, Kyoto, Kyoto Prefecture 606-8052

Telephone
+81-75-211-1215

Hasedera  (長谷寺)

A mystical kannon statue, hydrangea at full bloom, a modern dry landscape garden. This is the Hasedera temple in Kamakura, the probably second oldest temple in the city, also simply known as Hase kannon. It is the 4th station of the thirty-three Kannon pilgrimage in the Kanto area.

The Hasedera temple is most famous for its eleven-headed Kannon statue, which is over 9 meters high. The temple is of the Jodo school of Buddhism and is said to have been founded in 736.

The Hasedera garden and Hojo-ike pond can be found just behind the temple entrance while it is advised to climb until the top of the mountain to have a stunning view over the ocean.

Contents

Introduction
History of the temple
Buildings
-Kannon-dō
-Amida-dō
-Jizo-dō
-Benten-dō/ Benten-kutsu
-Daikoku-dō
-Inari-sha
-Kyōzō
-Shoin
Gardens
-Go-en Garden
-Mossy Pond Garden
-Hojo Pond Garden
Plants in the Garden
The Kannon Museum
Events
Restaurants & Cafes
Anika’s Impressions
Access & Gerneral Information
Around Hasedera

14 pages
31 pictures
17 MB / 24MB
2019

eBook will be delivered as pdf and mobi

 
 

Hasedera Video

Watch the Hasedera video here.

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Directions

How to get there
You can take a bus or the train from Kamakura station to get to Hase.
Kamakura bus number 4 (鎌4) takes you to the Hase-Kannon (長谷観音) bus stop in 7 minutes.

If you prefer to go by train, take Enoshima-Dentetsu line and get off at the third stop Hase station (長谷). It should take only 5 minutes.

If you are visiting the Great Buddha (Daibutsu, at Kotoku-in) in Hase, the temple is just a 10 minute walk away.

Opening times
March – September: 8am – 5pm
Otober – February: 8am – 4:30pm

Admission
300 yen

Address
11-2, Hase 3-chome, Kamakura, Kanagawa 248-0016

Sankei-en  (三溪園)

This beautiful landscape garden in Yokohama is one of Japan’s youngest gardens. Construction works began in 1902 and it was opened to the public in 1906. The founder of the garden, Sankei Hara, a silk trader from Yokohama, has collected numerous buildings from all over Japan. Japanese buildings can often be dismantled and put together in another place. This is what Sankei did to preserve these historically significant buildings.

The garden has several ponds and streams. In the outer garden, next to the main pond, the Main Hall and three-storied pagoda of Tōmyō-ji temple in Kyoto have been rebuilt.

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Directions

How to get there
From the Yokohama main station, take bus number 8 towards Honmoku-Shako (本牧車庫) and get off at Honmoku-Sankei-en-mae. From there, walking in south western direction, follow the signs toward the park entrance.

Address
58-1 Honmokusannotani, Naka Ward, Yokohama, Kanagawa Prefecture

Admission
500 yen

Openting times
9am – 5pm (last entrance 30 before closing time)
Not open between December 29th and 31st.

Shōmyō-ji  (称名寺)

The Shōmyō-ji is a Buddhist temple of the Shingon school of Buddhism in Yokohama, Kanagawa-Ken. It was founded in the Kamakura period (1185-1333) as a family temple of the Hojo clan, the powerholders of the Kamakura period. The garden is laid out as a Pure Land Paradise garden with a pond that symbolizes the ocean that devided birth and death. The red bridge connects the world of Buddha with the human world.

Good cherry blossom viewing spot!

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Directions

How to get there
From Yokohama station, take the Keikyu Main line from platform 1 towards Keikyu-Kurihama. Get off after 16 minutes and 2 stop at Kanazawabunko station. From there, walk 500m in eastern direction, then turn north and walk 100 meters to get to the temple.

Opening times
9am – 4pm, closed on Monday

Admission
Free

Address
Kanagawa-ken, Yokohama-shi, Kanazawa-ku, Kanazawachō, 212−1 称名寺金堂

Kenroku-en  (兼六園)

Kenroku-en is one of the Three Great Gardens of Japan. It was built in the Edo period (1603-1868) for the Maeda daimyo clan. It used to be the outer garden of the Kanazawa castle.
The garden has a large pond and several panoramic views around it. The oldest fountain of Japan can also be found here.

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Directions

How to get there
From Kanazawa station (金沢), you can take a taxi to get to Kenroku-en (10 minutes) or walk the 2 kilometers (about 30 minutes).

Opening times
March-October 15th: 7am-6pm
October 16th-February: 8am-5pm

Admission
300 yen
“Kenrokuen+1 Tickets”, which allow admission to Kenrokuen Garden and one more cultural facility within the city, are also available for purchase for 500 yen.

Address
石川県金沢市兼六町1-4
Ishikawa-Ken, Kanazawa-Shi, Rokuen-cho 1-4

Kōraku-en  (後楽園)

The Kōraku-en gardens are a large strolling garden with a meandering stream and belong to the Three Great Gardens in Japan. They have been built in 1700 (Edo period) by the lord of the Okayama area, Ikeda Tsunamasa. It took more than 13 years to finish the construction works. Although the park was used for the amusement of the daimyo family and their guests, regular people also were allowed to visit the gardens on special days.

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Directions

How to get there
From Okayama station, take the tram towards Higashiyama (東山). After 3 stops, get off at Shiroshita (城下). From there, walk straight ahead for 350m and cross the bridge.

You can also take a bus to the gardens: From Okayama station, go to bus terminal 4 and take the bus headed for Fujiwara Danchi.

Opening times
March 20 – September: 7:30am – 6pm.
October – March 19: 8am – 5pm

Admission
400 yen
An audio guide is available for 500 yen.

Address
〒703-8257, 岡山県岡山市北区後楽園1-5
Korakuen 1-5, Kita-ku, Okayama City 703-8257

Tonogayato Teien  (殿ヶ谷戸庭園)

The Tonogayato Teien is a landscape garden, built between 1914 and 1916 (Taisho period) near Tokyo. It was built for the residence of the vice president of the Manchurian Railway company.In 1929, the estate was bought by a member of the Iwasaki family. Nowadays, the garden is enjoyed by young and mid-aged people, and you will probably be the only foreign visitor there.

There is a tea house on the premises that can be rented for tea ceremonies. The garden is a mixture of Japanese and European strolling garden. It is just 20 minutes by train from Shinjuku Station but feels very remote from everyday life in metropolitan Tokyo.

Contents:
Introduction
History
Buildings
The Gardens
Other Highlights
Anikas Impressions
Around Tonogayato Teien

15 pages full of information about the Tonogayato Garden
41 pictures of the gardens

PDF 20MB
mobi 25MB
The eBook is delivered as PDF and mobi.

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Tonogayato-teien Trailer
Watch the Tonogayato-teien trailer here.

RJG presents: Tonogayato-teien from Real Japanese Gardens on Vimeo.

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Directions

How to get there
From Shinjuku, take the Chuo line towards Kawaguchiko and get off at the fifth stop, Kokubunji (国分寺)。From there, it is only a short walk to the gardens.

Opening times
9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Last entry until 4:30 p.m.

Admission
150 Yen

Address
JP: 東京都国分寺市南町二丁目
Tokyo-to, Kokubunji-shi, Minami-cho, 2 chome

Asakura-chōso-kan  (朝倉彫塑館)

This sculpture museum is situated in Yanaka, which is a district in Tokyo’s Taito ward. It is the former home and studio of the Japanese sculptor Asakura Fumio (1883 – 1964). The house, studio, and garden have been designed by the artist himself, and it took 7 years to complete the construction works (1935).

Contents:
Introduction
Asakura Fumio
The Five Constants
The Garden
Anika’s impressions
Around the Asakura-chōso-kan

10 pages full of information about the gardens of Asakura-chōso-kan
2 illustrations of the courtyard garden
12 pictures of the gardens

PDF 34MB
mobi 15MB

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Directions

How to get there
The museum is a 5-minute walk away from Nippori station on the Yamanote line.

Opening times
9:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. (last entry 4:00 p.m.)
Closed from Dec. 29 – Jan. 1
Also Mondays and Fridays.
If there is a holiday on one of these days, the mueseum will be open and then close the following day.

Admission fee
Dult: 500 Yen

Address
台東区谷中7-18-10
Taito-ku, Yanaka 7-18-10

Kiyosumi Teien  (清澄庭園)

The Kiyosumi gardens are said to have been part of the residence of the businessman Kinokuniya Bunzaemon in the Edo period (1603-1868). In the Meiji period, the founder of Mitsubishi, Iwasaki Yataro, bought the land and remodeled the garden to entertain guests as well as for the enjoyment of his employees.
Today it is famous for its very special stones, collected from all over Japan.

Contents:
Introduction
History
Buildings
Stones and Stone Constructions
Other Highlights
Anikas Impressions
Around Kiyosumi garden

14 pages full of information about the Kiyosumi Garden
31 pictures of the gardens

PDF 20MB
mobi 25MB

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Kiyosumi-teien Video

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Directions

How to get there
Kiyosumi-Shirakawa station is the closest to the garden. It is served by the Hanzomon and Oedo Metro lines. From the station, walk 100m south.

Opening times
9am – 5pm (last entrance at 4:30)

Closed around New Year between December 29th and January 1st.

Admission
150 Yen

Address
JP: 東京都江東区清澄二・三丁目
EN: Tokyo, Koto-ku, Kiyosumi 2-3Chome

Kyū-Furukawa Teien  (旧古河庭園)

The Kyū-Furukawa estate in Tokyo’s Kita-Ku has been built by Josiah Conder in 1917, the Japanese garden was designed by Ogawa Jihei. Josiah Conder was a British architect, who was invited to Japan in 1877 to teach architecture at the Imperial College of Engineering. He also wrote the Japanese garden classic ‘Landscape gardening in Japan’.

The Kyū-Furukawa garden has two main parts – the western-style villa with a beautiful rose garden in the upper part of the grounds. The lower part of the garden has a Shinji-ike (心字池), a pond shaped like the Chinese character for ‘heart’ or ‘mind’. There is also a dry waterfall, a tea house and a small stream with a 10m waterfall that feeds the pond. For 500 Yen, you can have tea and Japanese sweets in the tea house.

In autumn, when the roses are flowering (mid-October to late November), and the Japanese maples (mid-November to early December) show off their colorful foliage, the garden is especially delightful. But also in spring (late April to mid-May), the azaleas and the rose’s first flowers are in full bloom.

Contents:
Introduction
History
Buildings
The Gardens
Other Highlights
Anikas Impressions
Around Kyu-Furukawa Teien

14 pages full of information about the Kyu-Furukawa Garden
35 pictures of the gardens

PDF 14MB
mobi 23MB

The eBook is delivered as PDF and mobi.

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Directions

How to get there
The garden is 15 minutes by foot from the Komagome station (駒込駅, JR Yamanote line, Nanboku subway line). From the station, walk in northern direction.

Another option is to take the Keihin-Tohoku line to Kami-Nakazato (上中里) and walk towards the south.

Address
JP: 東京都北区西ヶ原 1-27-39
EN: 1-27-39 Nishigahara, Kita-ku, Tokyo

Telephone
03-3910-0394

Opening hours
9am – 5pm (last entrance at 4:30)

Closed around New Year between December 29th and January 1st.

Admission
150 Yen