Tokyo Imperial Palace Ninomaru Gardens  (東御苑の二の丸庭園)

The public Japanese garden of the Tokyo Imperial Palace can be found in the secondary circle of defense of the palace, the Ninomaru (second circle).
This is the place where the most important palace buildings once stood.
The Edo castle was the residence of the shoguns of the Tokugawa shogunate between 1603 and 1867, but also the Meiji emperor resided here before moving to the Imperial Palace “next door”.
The grounds of the real Imperial Palace are only open to the public on New Years Day and the Emperor’s birthday (February 23).

Contents:
Introduction
History
Highlights
Wall building types
How to visit
Anikas Impressions
Around the Imperial Palace

14 pages full of information about the Ninomaru Garden
32 pictures of the garden

PDF 47MB
mobi 13MB

The eBook is delivered as PDF and mobi as a small present.

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Directions

How to get there
The closest station on the Yamanote line is Tokyo main station.

Opening times
April-August: 9am – 5pm
September, October, March: 9am-4:30pm
November-February: 9am-4pm

Closed on Mondays, Fridays and New Year (Dec 28 to Jan 3).

Admission
Free

Address
JP: 東京都千代田区千代田1-1
EN: Tokyo, Chiyoda-Ku, Chiyoda 1-1

Shinjuku Gyoen  (新宿御苑)

Surprisingly, Shinjuku Gyoen has one of the most beautiful Japanese gardens in Tokyo. It is a vast park and has different garden sections: a Japanese garden with two ponds connected by a small river, a formal French garden with roses en masse and an English Landscape garden.

The park used to be the residence of the Naitō daimyō clan and was built in the Edo period (1603-1868). In the Meiji period (1868-1912), the Imperial Household Agency took over the garden and remodeled it for the imperial family in 1906. It was completely destroyed in the Second World War in 1945. In 1949, the gardens were opened to the public for the first time.

Especially in spring, between end of March and end of April, the Japanese garden is worth a visit when more than 1500 cherry trees turn the landscapes in all shades of white and pink. The perfectly round trimmed azaleas shine in a bright pink and purple in May and June. There is also a Japanese tea house with a marvellous view of the pond, surrounded by a tree panorama that manages to screen out Tokyo’s modern buildings.

Contents:
Introduction
History
Buildings
Gardens
Anikas Impressions
Around Shinjuku Gyoen

17 pages full of information about the Shinjuku Gyoen
33 pictures of the gardens

PDF 22MB
mobi 19MB

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Directions

How to get there
You can get to the park by either walking in a westward direction from Shinjuku Station or Yoyogi Station or take the Marunouchi line to Shinjuku-Gyoen-Mae station (新宿御苑前). Another subway station close by is Shinjuku San-chome (新宿三丁目), served by Marunouchi line, Shinjuku line and Fukutoshin line.

Admission
500 yen

Opening times
10/1 – 3/14 9:00am to 4:00pm (closes at 4:30)
3/15 – 9/30 9:00am to 5:30pm (closes at 6:00)
7/1 – 8/20 9:00am to 6:30pm (closes at 7:00)
Closed on Mondays and between December 29th and January 3rd

Tel
+81-(0)3-3350-0151 

Address
11 Naitomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo

Rikugien  (六義園 )

One of the most beautiful gardens in Tokyo, the Rikugien offers a quiet resting and strolling place in the hectic Tokyo life. It is situated in the quiet neighborhood of Komagome and Sugamo (Bunkyo ward), which are also worth a visit.

The garden is a strolling garden of the Edo period (1603-1868). Samurai Yanagisawa Yoshiyasu built the garden with the permission of the shogun Tokugawa Tsunayoshi between 1695 and 1702. Originally, 88 famous views from Japanese and Chinese landscapes have been imitated in miniature form in this garden, however, only 32 remain today. The garden’s name translates literally Six Rules Garden and refers to the six basic rules of Waka poetry. Waka translates as “Japanese Poem”, and has its roots in the Heian period (794-1185).

Rikugi-en is one of Tokyo’s finest gardens and offers the visitor an ever-changing landscape. Although its square footage is considerable, the garden feels closed and intimate. We recommend enjoying the view over the garden while having a bowl of green matcha tea in the tea house.

Contents:
Introduction
History
Buildings
Bridges
Highlights
Anikas Impressions
Around Rikugien

17 pages full of information about the Rikugien Garden
39 pictures of the gardens

PDF 25MB
mobi 19MB

 
 

Rikugi-en Video
Watch the Rikugi-en video here.

Real Japanese Gardens – Rikugien 2014 from Real Japanese Gardens on Vimeo.

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Directions

How to get there
The garden is hidden in the quiet neighborhood of Komagome and Sugamo in the north of central Tokyo, but can be reached conveniently by the Yamanote line or the Namboku line, Komagome station. The garden is south of the station.

Address
JP: 東京都文京区本駒込六丁目
EN: 6 Chome Honkomagome Bunkyō-ku, Tōkyō

Admission
300 Yen

Opening times
9am-5pm (last entry 4:30pm)

Closed between December 29th and January 1st