Kyū-Asakurake House(旧朝倉家住宅)

Shibuya is one of Tokyo’s liveliest district – and in its middle, you can find this calm residence from 1919. Asakura Torajiro, the chairman of the Tokyo council had built this house and its beautiful garden in Daikanyama.

Contents:
  • Introduction
  • History The Main Building Features of the MainBuilding The Storehouse The Garage The Gardens Garden Features Anikas Impressions Around the Asakura House

14 pages full of information about the Kyu-Asakura House
33 scenic pictures
12MB

The eBook is delivered as PDF.

Feel free to pin these pictures to your Pinterest board:

Directions

How to get there
The closest station is Daikanyama (代官山), a station of the Toyoko line (between Shibuya and Naka-meguro). Ebisu station (Yamanote line, Hibiya line) is also only a 10 minute walk away.

Opening times
March-October: 10am – 6pm (entry allowed until 5:30pm)
November-February: 10am – 4:30pm (entry allowed until 4pm)

Closed on Mondays and between December 29th and January 3rd.

Admission
100 Yen

Address
JP: 東京都渋谷区猿楽町29−20
EN: 29-20 Sarugakucho, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo

Telephone
03-3476-1021
Gardens

Kōsei-in  (廣誠院)

A small temple of the Rinzai school of Buddhism. The interior has wonderful Fusuma-e (screen paintings) and a view on the walled garden.Taking pictures is not allowed inside the temple, but the garden is definitely worth a visit.
  •  Click to view details

Directions

How to get there Take the Kyoto city bus 205 from Kyoto station and get off at the eighth bus stop Shiyakusho-mae (京都市役所前). It takes about 18 minutes.A faster alternative would be to take the Karasuma subway until Karasuma-oike (烏丸御池) and change to the Tozai line. After two stops, get off at Kyoto Shiyakusho-mae.From Kyoto Shiyakusho-mae, walk a block in northern direction, and after you have passed the Hotel Okura, turn right.Admission Only open in early November, the entrance fee is 800 Yen.

Kōsei-in(廣誠院)

A small temple of the Rinzai school of Buddhism. The interior has wonderful Fusuma-e (screen paintings) and a view on the walled garden.

Taking pictures is not allowed inside the temple, but the garden is definitely worth a visit.

Feel free to pin these pictures to your Pinterest board:

Directions

How to get there
Take the Kyoto city bus 205 from Kyoto station and get off at the eighth bus stop Shiyakusho-mae (京都市役所前). It takes about 18 minutes.

A faster alternative would be to take the Karasuma subway until Karasuma-oike (烏丸御池) and change to the Tozai line. After two stops, get off at Kyoto Shiyakusho-mae.

From Kyoto Shiyakusho-mae, walk a block in northern direction, and after you have passed the Hotel Okura, turn right.

Admission
May only open in early November, the entrance fee is 800 Yen.

Address:
JP: 〒604-0924 京都府京都市中京区河原町通二条下る一之船入町 東入538−1
EN: Kosei-in, 538-1 Ichinofunairicho, Nakagyō-ku, Kyōto, Präfektur Kyōto
Gardens

Konchi-in(金地院 南禅寺)

Konchi-in is a sub-temple of the Nanzen-ji temple complex. The temple was built in the early 15th century by shogun Ashikaga Yoshimochi (足利義持). In 1605, it was relocated from northern Kyoto to its present location inside the Nanzen-ji temple complex. A few years later, between 1611 and 1632, the garden was built in preparation of the shogun’s visit. It is fairly certain that the famous garden designer and tea master Kobori Enshu (小堀遠州) has built the garden. A lot of gardens around Kyoto have been attributed to him, but in contrast to these, the creation process of this temple garden is very well documented.

The garden is said to have been designed as a two dimensional picture, not unlike a fusuma-e (襖絵)、a painting on the wooden screen that often depict landscape scenes and nature. Indeed, the garden can only be viewed from the veranda of the Main Hall of the temple. A wide band of light gray gravel separates the rock arrangements from the viewer. The main feature of the garden is the duo of Crane and Turtle island, arranged with rocks and shrubs.

Feel free to pin these pictures to your Pinterest board:
  •  Click to view details
eBook Coming…    

Directions

How to get there
Take city bus number 5 and get off the bus at the Nanzen-ji bus stop. Walk about 8 minutes in eastern direction. As for the subway, Keage Station on the Tozai line is a short 7-10 minute walk away.

The most beautiful way to get to Nanzen-ji and its sub-temples is to walk the picturesque Philosopher’s path, which connects Nanzen-ji and Ginkaku-ji, the Silver Pavilion.

Address
Nanzenji-Fukuchi-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto-city
京都市左京区南禅寺福地町

Admission
500 Yen
Gardens

Kōmyō-in (Tōfuku-ji)(光明院)

Kōmyō-in is one of Tofuku-ji temples sub-temples. It was founded in 1391 (Muromachi period) by Kinzan Myosho. In 1939, Shigemori Mirei laid out the dry landscape garden in front of the main building.

Feel free to pin these pictures to your Pinterest board:
  •  Click to view details
eBook Coming…    

Directions

How to get there
Take the Nara line from Kyoto station towards Nara. Get off at the first stop, Tōfuku-ji, and walk in southern direction until you get to Tōfuku-ji.

Opening times
7am – sunset

Admission
November: 300 yen
Rest of the year: donation

Address:
JP: 京都市東山区本町15丁目809
EN: 15 Chome-809 Honmachi, Higashiyama Ward, Kyoto, 605-0981
Gardens

Kiyosumi Teien(清澄庭園)

The Kiyosumi gardens are said to have been part of the residence of the businessman Kinokuniya Bunzaemon in the Edo period (1603-1868). In the Meiji period, the founder of Mitsubishi, Iwasaki Yataro, bought the land and remodeled the garden to entertain guests as well as for the enjoyment of his employees.
Today it is famous for its very special stones, collected from all over Japan.

Contents:
  • Introduction
  • History
  • Buildings
  • Stones and Stone
  • Constructions
  • Other Highlights
  • Anikas Impressions
  • Around Kiyosumi garden

14 pages full of information about the Kiyosumi Garden
31 pictures of the gardens
PDF 20MB

The eBook is delivered as PDF.

Feel free to pin these pictures to your Pinterest board:

Directions

How to get there
Kiyosumi-Shirakawa station is the closest to the garden. It is served by the Hanzomon and Oedo Metro lines. From the station, walk 100m south.

Opening times
9am – 5pm (last entrance at 4:30)

Closed around New Year between December 29th and January 1st.

Admission
150 Yen

Address
JP: 東京都江東区清澄二・三丁目
EN: Tokyo, Koto-ku, Kiyosumi 2-3Chome
Gardens

Kennin-ji (建仁寺)

Kennin-ji was built in 1202 and is Kyoto’s eldest Zen temple. It belongs to Kyoto’s Five Great Zen Temples after the Mountain system (Gozan – 号山).

There are two zen gardens: The Chou-on-tei,“The garden of the sound of the tide”, which has a San-zon-seki, a Buddhist triad stone arrangement and a Zenzen-seki for Sitting in Zazen meditation. The other garden is called “Circle-Triangle-Square” garden. The idea behind the“circle, triangle, square”is that all things in this universe can be represented by these forms.

Feel free to pin these pictures to your Pinterest board:
  •  Click to view details
eBook Coming…    

Directions

How to get there
Take the Kyoto city bus 4 from Kyoto station to Shijo-Kawaramachi-cho (四条河原町), it should take around 15 minutes. From there, got east over the Gion bridge. On the other side of the river, turn right and walk until you get to the next bridge. There, turn left and follow the street for 200 meters until you get to the entrance of Kennin-ji.

Opening times
10am – 5pm (last entrance 30 minutes earlier)

Might be closed between December 28th and 31st

Admission
600 yen
Gardens

Kajū-ji(勧修寺)

Kajū-ji、sometimes pronounced as Kanshu-ji, is the head temple of the Yamashina school of Shingon Buddhism. It was founded in year 900 (Heian period) by the emperor Daigo.

The garden has a large island pond with a great number of water lilies, iris and lotus. It is said that the ice of this pond had been collected on January 2nd of every year to be send to the Imperial Palace. Another feature of the garden is an uncommonly shaped stone lantern.
  •  Click to view details
eBook Coming…    

Directions

How to get there
From Kyoto station, take the Tokaido/Sanyo line from platform 11 or 12 towards Omishiotsu. Get off the train after 5 minutes at the first stop Yamashina (山科) and change to the Tozai line towards Rokujizo (六地蔵). After 3 stops (6 minutes), you will arrive at Ono station (小野). From there, walk west, cross the river and you will get to the temple within 7 minutes.

Opening times
9am – 4pm

Admission
400 Yen

Address
JP: 京都府京都市山科区勧修寺仁王堂町27-6
EN: 27-6 Kanshuji Niodocho, Yamashina Ward, Kyoto, 607-8226
Gardens

Jukō-in (Daitoku-ji)(聚光院)

Jukō-in is a sub-temple of Daitoku-ji. It was established in 1566 after the death of daimyo Miyoshi Nagayoshi. The graves of its founding abbot Shorei Sokin and the famous Japanese tea master Sen no Rikyu can also be found here.

The Hōjō or abbot’s quarters feature superb fusuma-e of Kano Eitoku that date back to 1566.

Feel free to pin these pictures to your Pinterest board:
  •  Click to view details
eBook coming…    

Directions

How to get there
Bus: Take the bus 205 or 206 and get off at the stop ‘Daitoku-ji’.
Subway: Take the Karasuma line to Kitaō-ji station and walk about 15 minutes in a westward direction.

Admission
Generally closed to the public

Address
EN: 〒603-8231, Kyoto-Shi, Kita-Ku, Murasakino, 53 Daitoku-ji-Chō
JP: 〒603-8231, 京都市 北区 紫野 大徳寺町53
Gardens

Jōruri-ji(浄瑠璃寺)

Jōruri-ji (浄瑠璃寺) is a temple of the Jōdo school of Pure Land Buddhism. It was founded in 1047 by the priest Eshin. It is laid out around a large pond, which was dug out in 1150. Ponds in temples of the Pure Land school symbolize the ocean between birth and death, with a center island that depicts earth.

Directions

How to get there
From Kyoto station, take the JR Nara line towards Nara. After 6 stops and 35 minutes, change trains in Kizu (木津) to the Kansai Main like towards Kamo (加茂). Get off the train in Kamo and take a taxi to the temple (5km, 12 minutes)

Opening times
9am – 5pm

Admission
300 Yen

Address
京都府木津川市加茂町西小札場40
Futaba-40 Kamocho Nishio Kizugawa, Kyoto Prefecture 619-1135
Gardens

Kyū-Furukawa Teien(旧古河庭園)

The Kyū-Furukawa estate in Tokyo’s Kita-Ku has been built by Josiah Conder in 1917, the Japanese garden was designed by Ogawa Jihei. Josiah Conder was a British architect, who was invited to Japan in 1877 to teach architecture at the Imperial College of Engineering. He also wrote the Japanese garden classic ‘Landscape gardening in Japan’.

The Kyū-Furukawa garden has two main parts – the western-style villa with a beautiful rose garden in the upper part of the grounds. The lower part of the garden has a Shinji-ike (心字池), a pond shaped like the Chinese character for ‘heart’ or ‘mind’. There is also a dry waterfall, a tea house and a small stream with a 10m waterfall that feeds the pond. For 500 Yen, you can have tea and Japanese sweets in the tea house.

In autumn, when the roses are flowering (mid-October to late November), and the Japanese maples (mid-November to early December) show off their colorful foliage, the garden is especially delightful. But also in spring (late April to mid-May), the azaleas and the rose’s first flowers are in full bloom.

Contents:
  • Introduction
  • History
  • Buildings
  • The Gardens
  • Other Highlights
  • Anikas Impressions
  • Around Kyu-Furukawa Teien

14 pages full of information about the Kyu-Furukawa Garden 35 pictures of the gardens
PDF 14MB

The eBook is delivered as PDF.

Feel free to pin these pictures to your Pinterest board:

Directions

How to get there
The garden is 15 minutes by foot from the Komagome station (駒込駅, JR Yamanote line, Nanboku subway line). From the station, walk in northern direction.

Another option is to take the Keihin-Tohoku line to Kami-Nakazato (上中里) and walk towards the south.

Address
JP: 東京都北区西ヶ原 1-27-39
EN: 1-27-39 Nishigahara, Kita-ku, Tokyo

Telephone
03-3910-0394

Opening hours
9am – 5pm (last entrance at 4:30)

Closed around New Year between December 29th and January 1st.

Admission
150 Yen
Gardens