Nezu Museum(根津美術館)

The Nezu museum is a private collection of Japanese and Asian art – from calligraphy to painting, ceramics, and textiles. The industrialist and president of the Tobu railway company, Nezu Kaichiro was an avid art collector.

The site of the museum and garden used to be his private residence, which he bought in 1906. After his death in 1940, his son founded the museum to preserve the collection. In World War II, however, the museum and gardens were severely destroyed.

The hilly garden has two ponds that are connected by small streams. Upon every turn of the numerous winding paths, you can see a new garden lantern, memorial stone, Buddha or Kan’non statue. The garden also has some well-preserved tea houses. Near the main building, you can find a modern cafe. The wide window front on three sides lets you enjoy the garden while having a light lunch or coffee and cake.

Contents of the eBook
  • Introduction
  • History
  • Buildings
  • Stone Works
  • Highlights
  • Anikas Impressions
  • Around the Nezu Museum


14 pages full of information about the Nezu Museum
41 pictures of the garden
PDF 17MB

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Nezu-Museum Trailer Watch the Nezu-Museum trailer here.

Directions

How to get there
The closest metro station is Omotesando. Chiyoda line, Ginza line and Hanzomon line stop here. Use exit 4 or 5 and walk down the small end of Omotesando towards south east. After 400m you should reach the museum.

Opening times
10am – 5pm (last entry 4:30pm)

Admission
1300 Yen for the general exhibition (previously purchased online)
1400 Yen for same-day tickets
Special exhibitions cost differently.
Garden only accessible after ticket purchase.

Address
JP: 東京都港区南青山6丁目5−1
EN: Tokyo-to, Minato-ku, Minami-Aoyama 6-chome 5-1
Gardens

Mukōjima-hyakka-en(向島百花園)

This garden was built by an antique dealer between 1804 and 1830.

The name of the garden means “a garden with a hundred flowers that bloom throughout the four seasons”, and the garden is indeed known for very beautiful flowering trees and shrubs.

At the time when the garden first opened, its main feature was 360 ume trees.

In later years, many different blooming flowers and plants mentioned in classic Chinese and Japanese works of literature and poetry were collected, enabling visitors to enjoy blooming flowers throughout the year.

The garden is the only surviving flower garden from the Edo Period. What is also special about it is that it was not built as a part of a residence.

Contents of the eBook:
  • Introduction
  • History
  • Highlights
  • Flower Highlights
  • Anikas Impressions
  • Around Mukōjima-hyakkaen

12 pages full of information about the Mukōjima-hyakkaen
20 pictures of the garden
PDF 14MB

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Directions

How to get there
The closest metro station is Higashi-Mukojima of the Tobu-Skytree-Line. From the station, head 500m east to get to the garden.

Opening times
9am – 5pm (last entrance at 4:30)

Closed around New Year between December 29th and January 3rd.

Admission
150 Yen

Address
JP: 東京都墨田区東向島三丁目
EN: Tokyo, Sumida-ku, Higashimukojima 3-18-3
Gardens

Tonogayato Teien(殿ヶ谷戸庭園)

The Tonogayato Teien is a Japanese landscape garden, built between 1914 and 1916 (Taisho period) near Tokyo. It was built for the residence of the vice president of the Manchurian Railway company.

In 1929, the estate was bought by a member of the Iwasaki family. Nowadays, the garden is enjoyed by young and mid-aged people, and you will probably be the only foreign visitor there.

There is a tea house on the premises that can be rented for tea ceremonies. The garden is a mixture of Japanese and European strolling garden. It is just 20 minutes by train from Shinjuku Station but feels very remote from everyday life in metropolitan Tokyo.

Contents of the eBook:
  • Introduction
  • History
  • Buildings
  • The Gardens
  • Other Highlights
  • Anikas Impressions
  • Around Tonogayato Teien

15 pages full of information about the Tonogayato Garden
41 pictures of the gardens

PDF 20MB
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Directions

How to get there
From Shinjuku, take the Chuo line towards Kawaguchiko and get off at the fifth stop, Kokubunji (国分寺)。From there, it is only a short walk to the gardens.

Opening times
9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Last entry until 4:30 p.m.

Admission
150 Yen

Address
JP: 東京都国分寺市南町二丁目
Tokyo-to, Kokubunji-shi, Minami-cho, 2 chome
Gardens

Kyū-Asakurake House(旧朝倉家住宅)

Shibuya is one of Tokyo’s liveliest district – and in its middle, you can find this calm residence from 1919. Asakura Torajiro, the chairman of the Tokyo council had built this house and its beautiful garden in Daikanyama.

Contents:
  • Introduction
  • History The Main Building Features of the MainBuilding The Storehouse The Garage The Gardens Garden Features Anikas Impressions Around the Asakura House

14 pages full of information about the Kyu-Asakura House
33 scenic pictures
12MB

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Directions

How to get there
The closest station is Daikanyama (代官山), a station of the Toyoko line (between Shibuya and Naka-meguro). Ebisu station (Yamanote line, Hibiya line) is also only a 10 minute walk away.

Opening times
March-October: 10am – 6pm (entry allowed until 5:30pm)
November-February: 10am – 4:30pm (entry allowed until 4pm)

Closed on Mondays and between December 29th and January 3rd.

Admission
100 Yen

Address
JP: 東京都渋谷区猿楽町29−20
EN: 29-20 Sarugakucho, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo

Telephone
03-3476-1021
Gardens

Kiyosumi Teien(清澄庭園)

The Kiyosumi gardens are said to have been part of the residence of the businessman Kinokuniya Bunzaemon in the Edo period (1603-1868). In the Meiji period, the founder of Mitsubishi, Iwasaki Yataro, bought the land and remodeled the garden to entertain guests as well as for the enjoyment of his employees.
Today it is famous for its very special stones, collected from all over Japan.

Contents:
  • Introduction
  • History
  • Buildings
  • Stones and Stone
  • Constructions
  • Other Highlights
  • Anikas Impressions
  • Around Kiyosumi garden

14 pages full of information about the Kiyosumi Garden
31 pictures of the gardens
PDF 20MB

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Directions

How to get there
Kiyosumi-Shirakawa station is the closest to the garden. It is served by the Hanzomon and Oedo Metro lines. From the station, walk 100m south.

Opening times
9am – 5pm (last entrance at 4:30)

Closed around New Year between December 29th and January 1st.

Admission
150 Yen

Address
JP: 東京都江東区清澄二・三丁目
EN: Tokyo, Koto-ku, Kiyosumi 2-3Chome
Gardens

Kyū-Furukawa Teien(旧古河庭園)

The Kyū-Furukawa estate in Tokyo’s Kita-Ku has been built by Josiah Conder in 1917, the Japanese garden was designed by Ogawa Jihei. Josiah Conder was a British architect, who was invited to Japan in 1877 to teach architecture at the Imperial College of Engineering. He also wrote the Japanese garden classic ‘Landscape gardening in Japan’.

The Kyū-Furukawa garden has two main parts – the western-style villa with a beautiful rose garden in the upper part of the grounds. The lower part of the garden has a Shinji-ike (心字池), a pond shaped like the Chinese character for ‘heart’ or ‘mind’. There is also a dry waterfall, a tea house and a small stream with a 10m waterfall that feeds the pond. For 500 Yen, you can have tea and Japanese sweets in the tea house.

In autumn, when the roses are flowering (mid-October to late November), and the Japanese maples (mid-November to early December) show off their colorful foliage, the garden is especially delightful. But also in spring (late April to mid-May), the azaleas and the rose’s first flowers are in full bloom.

Contents:
  • Introduction
  • History
  • Buildings
  • The Gardens
  • Other Highlights
  • Anikas Impressions
  • Around Kyu-Furukawa Teien

14 pages full of information about the Kyu-Furukawa Garden 35 pictures of the gardens
PDF 14MB

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Directions

How to get there
The garden is 15 minutes by foot from the Komagome station (駒込駅, JR Yamanote line, Nanboku subway line). From the station, walk in northern direction.

Another option is to take the Keihin-Tohoku line to Kami-Nakazato (上中里) and walk towards the south.

Address
JP: 東京都北区西ヶ原 1-27-39
EN: 1-27-39 Nishigahara, Kita-ku, Tokyo

Telephone
03-3910-0394

Opening hours
9am – 5pm (last entrance at 4:30)

Closed around New Year between December 29th and January 1st.

Admission
150 Yen
Gardens

Happō-en(八芳園)

Nowadays, the beautiful Happō-en gardens serve mainly as a backdrop for traditional Japanese wedding parties and banquets. There is a kaiseki restaurant overlooking the Japanese garden and a tea house where visitors can get a bowl of green tea and Japanese sweets.

The Japanese garden has been built in the early 17th century in the old Edo’s gentle hills, and a natural stream runs through it. In the early 1915, the industrialist Fusanosuke Kuhara (久原 房之助) remodeled the garden and built most of today’s buildings.

Most of the bonsai trees in the garden are over 100 years old, one of them is 520 years old. The Suichin (水停) is a waterside resting arbor that seems to float above the pond.

Contents:
  • History
  • Buildings
  • Restaurants & Chapels
  • The Gates
  • Stone Works
  • Other Highlights
  • Anika’s Impressions
  • How to get there
  • Around Happō-en

15 pages full of information about Happō-en
37 pictures of the garden

PDF 20MB

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Directions

How to get there
The closest station is Shirokane-dai (白金台). Namboku line and Mita line connect the station to the Yamanote ring line (Meguro station). In Shirokane-dai, take exit No. 2 to get to the garden.

Admission fee
No admission fee

Address
JP: 〒108-0071 東京都港区白金台1−1−1
EN: 〒108-0071 Tokyo, Minato-ku, Shirokanedai 1-1-1

Telephone
03-3443-3111
Gardens

Asakura-chōso-kan(朝倉彫塑館)

This sculpture museum is situated in Yanaka, which is a district in Tokyo’s Taito ward. It is the former home and studio of the Japanese sculptor Asakura Fumio (1883 – 1964). The house, studio, and garden have been designed by the artist himself, and it took 7 years to complete the construction works (1935).

Contents:
  • Introduction
  • Asakura Fumio
  • The Five Constants
  • The Garden
  • Anika’s impressions
  • Around the Asakura-chōso-kan


10 pages full of information about the gardens of Asakura-chōso-kan
2 illustrations of the courtyard garden
12 pictures of the gardens
PDF 34MB

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Directions

How to get there
The museum is a 5-minute walk away from Nippori station on the Yamanote line.

Opening times
9:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. (last entry 4:00 p.m.)
Closed from Dec. 29 – Jan. 1
Also Mondays and Thursdays.
If there is a holiday on one of these days, the mueseum will be open and then close the following day.

Admission fee
500 Yen

Address
台東区谷中7-18-10
Taito-ku, Yanaka 7-18-10

Picture taking not allowed
Gardens

Shinjuku Gyoen(新宿御苑)

Surprisingly, Shinjuku Gyoen has one of the most beautiful Japanese gardens in Tokyo. It is a vast park and has different garden sections: a Japanese garden with two ponds connected by a small river, a formal French garden with roses en masse and an English Landscape garden.

The park used to be the residence of the Naitō daimyō clan and was built in the Edo period (1603-1868). In the Meiji period (1868-1912), the Imperial Household Agency took over the garden and remodeled it for the imperial family in 1906. It was completely destroyed in the Second World War in 1945. In 1949, the gardens were opened to the public for the first time.

Especially in spring, between end of March and end of April, the Japanese garden is worth a visit when more than 1500 cherry trees turn the landscapes in all shades of white and pink. The perfectly round trimmed azaleas shine in a bright pink and purple in May and June. There is also a Japanese tea house with a marvellous view of the pond, surrounded by a tree panorama that manages to screen out Tokyo’s modern buildings.

Contents:
  • Introduction
  • History
  • Buildings
  • Gardens
  • Anikas Impressions
  • Around Shinjuku Gyoen


17 pages full of information about the Shinjuku Gyoen
33 pictures of the gardens

22MB
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Directions

How to get there
You can get to the park by either walking in a westward direction from Shinjuku Station or Yoyogi Station or take the Marunouchi line to Shinjuku-Gyoen-Mae station (新宿御苑前). Another subway station close by is Shinjuku San-chome (新宿三丁目), served by Marunouchi line, Shinjuku line and Fukutoshin line.

Admission
500 yen

Opening times
10/1 – 3/14 9:00am to 4:00pm (closes at 4:30)
3/15 – 9/30 9:00am to 5:30pm (closes at 6:00)
7/1 – 8/20 9:00am to 6:30pm (closes at 7:00)
Closed on Mondays and between December 29th and January 3rd

Tel
+81-(0)3-3350-0151

Address
11 Naitomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo
Gardens

Rikugien(六義園 )

One of the most beautiful gardens in Tokyo, the Rikugien offers a quiet resting and strolling place in the hectic Tokyo life. It is situated in the quiet neighborhood of Komagome and Sugamo (Bunkyo ward), which are also worth a visit.

The garden is a strolling garden of the Edo period (1603-1868). Samurai Yanagisawa Yoshiyasu built the garden with the permission of the shogun Tokugawa Tsunayoshi between 1695 and 1702. Originally, 88 famous views from Japanese and Chinese landscapes have been imitated in miniature form in this garden, however, only 32 remain today. The garden’s name translates literally Six Rules Garden and refers to the six basic rules of Waka poetry. Waka translates as “Japanese Poem”, and has its roots in the Heian period (794-1185).

Rikugi-en is one of Tokyo’s finest gardens and offers the visitor an ever-changing landscape. Although its square footage is considerable, the garden feels closed and intimate. We recommend enjoying the view over the garden while having a bowl of green matcha tea in the tea house.

Contents:
  • Introduction
  • History
  • Buildings
  • Bridges
  • Highlights
  • Anikas Impressions
  • Around Rikugien

17 pages full of information about the Rikugien Garden
39 pictures of the gardens

PDF 25MB

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Rikugi-en Video
Watch the Rikugi-en video

Directions

How to get there
The garden is hidden in the quiet neighborhood of Komagome and Sugamo in the north of central Tokyo, but can be reached conveniently by the Yamanote line or the Namboku line, Komagome station. The garden is south of the station.

Address
JP: 東京都文京区本駒込六丁目
EN: 6 Chome Honkomagome Bunkyō-ku, Tōkyō

Admission
300 Yen

Opening times
9:00am – 5:00pm (last entry 4:30pm)
Closed between December 29th and January 1st
Gardens