Hamarikyū Teien  (浜離宮恩賜庭園)

The Hamarikyū garden is a large strolling garden directly next to Tokyo bay. It was built by the shogun Tokugawa in the Edo period (1603-1868). The garden’s ponds are connected to the Tokyo bay so the water level of the ponds changed with the tide. Large parts of the garden were reed fields, and the southern garden was used by the Shogun’s family for falconry and duck hunting.

With the Meiji Restauration in 1868, the Tokugawa shogunate fell and the imperial family built a detached villa on the grounds of the garden. This is also where the garden’s name comes from – Hama (浜) means “beach”, “seashore”; and rikyū (離宮) means “detached palace”. Teien (庭園) is a word for “garden” or “park”.

The garden has meandering ponds interconnected by little streams. There is a tea house on the middle island (中島 – Nakashima) of the southern pond, a plum grove (visit in late February to March), a 300-year-old pine tree and a field of wildflowers (cosmea and rape flowers). It is a nice garden to take a long walk. Because the garden is large, you rarely meet other visitors.

A free audio guide in English is available at the ticket gates – it has several guided tours, but it also allows you to roam around freely and just gives you information when you come to an important part of the garden.

Contents:
  • Introduction
  • History
  • Buildings
  • Bridges
  • Mountains
  • Highlights
  • Flowers
  • Anikas Impressions
  • Around Hamarikyū garden


20 pages full of information about the Hamarikyū garden
38 pictures of the gardens

PDF 27MB

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Directions

How to get there
To get to Hamarikyu gardens, take the Yamanote line to Shinbashi (新橋駅) or the Oedo line to Shiodome(汐留駅)。Walk eastwards from there.
There is also the possibility to go by boat from Asakusa to the garden. But since the boat is quite low, often you don’t see more than the quay walls. The entrance fee to the garden is included in the fare.

Address
東京都中央区浜離宮庭園1-1
1-1 Hamarikyu Teien, Chuo, Tokyo

Telephone
03-3541-0200 ‎

Admission
300 Yen

Opening hours
9am – 5pm (last entry at 4:30pm)

Closed around New Year between December 29th and January 1st.

Mukōjima-hyakka-en  (向島百花園)

This garden was built by an antique dealer between 1804 and 1830.

The name of the garden means “a garden with a hundred flowers that bloom throughout the four seasons”, and the garden is indeed known for very beautiful flowering trees and shrubs.

At the time when the garden first opened, its main feature was 360 ume trees.

In later years, many different blooming flowers and plants mentioned in classic Chinese and Japanese works of literature and poetry were collected, enabling visitors to enjoy blooming flowers throughout the year.

The garden is the only surviving flower garden from the Edo Period. What is also special about it is that it was not built as a part of a residence.

Contents:

Introduction

History

Highlights

Flower Highlights

Anikas Impressions

Around Mukōjima-hyakkaen

12 pages full of information about the Mukōjima-hyakkaen

20 pictures of the garden

PDF 14MB

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Directions

How to get there
The closest metro station is Higashi-Mukojima of the Tobu-Skytree-Line. From the station, head 500m east to get to the garden.

Opening times
9am – 5pm (last entrance at 4:30)

Closed around New Year between December 29th and January 3rd.

Admission
150 Yen

Address
JP: 東京都墨田区東向島三丁目
EN: Tokyo, Sumida-ku, Higashimukojima 3-18-3

Tonogayato Teien  (殿ヶ谷戸庭園)

The Tonogayato Teien is a landscape garden, built between 1914 and 1916 (Taisho period) near Tokyo. It was built for the residence of the vice president of the Manchurian Railway company.In 1929, the estate was bought by a member of the Iwasaki family. Nowadays, the garden is enjoyed by young and mid-aged people, and you will probably be the only foreign visitor there.

There is a tea house on the premises that can be rented for tea ceremonies. The garden is a mixture of Japanese and European strolling garden. It is just 20 minutes by train from Shinjuku Station but feels very remote from everyday life in metropolitan Tokyo.

Contents:
Introduction
History
Buildings
The Gardens
Other Highlights
Anikas Impressions
Around Tonogayato Teien

15 pages full of information about the Tonogayato Garden
41 pictures of the gardens

PDF 20MB
mobi 25MB
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Tonogayato-teien Trailer
Watch the Tonogayato-teien trailer here.

RJG presents: Tonogayato-teien from Real Japanese Gardens on Vimeo.

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Directions

How to get there
From Shinjuku, take the Chuo line towards Kawaguchiko and get off at the fifth stop, Kokubunji (国分寺)。From there, it is only a short walk to the gardens.

Opening times
9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Last entry until 4:30 p.m.

Admission
150 Yen

Address
JP: 東京都国分寺市南町二丁目
Tokyo-to, Kokubunji-shi, Minami-cho, 2 chome

Asakura-chōso-kan  (朝倉彫塑館)

This sculpture museum is situated in Yanaka, which is a district in Tokyo’s Taito ward. It is the former home and studio of the Japanese sculptor Asakura Fumio (1883 – 1964). The house, studio, and garden have been designed by the artist himself, and it took 7 years to complete the construction works (1935).

Contents:
Introduction
Asakura Fumio
The Five Constants
The Garden
Anika’s impressions
Around the Asakura-chōso-kan

10 pages full of information about the gardens of Asakura-chōso-kan
2 illustrations of the courtyard garden
12 pictures of the gardens

PDF 34MB
mobi 15MB

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Directions

How to get there
The museum is a 5-minute walk away from Nippori station on the Yamanote line.

Opening times
9:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. (last entry 4:00 p.m.)
Closed from Dec. 29 – Jan. 1
Also Mondays and Fridays.
If there is a holiday on one of these days, the mueseum will be open and then close the following day.

Admission fee
Dult: 500 Yen

Address
台東区谷中7-18-10
Taito-ku, Yanaka 7-18-10

Kiyosumi Teien  (清澄庭園)

The Kiyosumi gardens are said to have been part of the residence of the businessman Kinokuniya Bunzaemon in the Edo period (1603-1868). In the Meiji period, the founder of Mitsubishi, Iwasaki Yataro, bought the land and remodeled the garden to entertain guests as well as for the enjoyment of his employees.
Today it is famous for its very special stones, collected from all over Japan.

Contents:
Introduction
History
Buildings
Stones and Stone Constructions
Other Highlights
Anikas Impressions
Around Kiyosumi garden

14 pages full of information about the Kiyosumi Garden
31 pictures of the gardens

PDF 20MB
mobi 25MB

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Kiyosumi-teien Video

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Directions

How to get there
Kiyosumi-Shirakawa station is the closest to the garden. It is served by the Hanzomon and Oedo Metro lines. From the station, walk 100m south.

Opening times
9am – 5pm (last entrance at 4:30)

Closed around New Year between December 29th and January 1st.

Admission
150 Yen

Address
JP: 東京都江東区清澄二・三丁目
EN: Tokyo, Koto-ku, Kiyosumi 2-3Chome

Kyū-Furukawa Teien  (旧古河庭園)

The Kyū-Furukawa estate in Tokyo’s Kita-Ku has been built by Josiah Conder in 1917, the Japanese garden was designed by Ogawa Jihei. Josiah Conder was a British architect, who was invited to Japan in 1877 to teach architecture at the Imperial College of Engineering. He also wrote the Japanese garden classic ‘Landscape gardening in Japan’.

The Kyū-Furukawa garden has two main parts – the western-style villa with a beautiful rose garden in the upper part of the grounds. The lower part of the garden has a Shinji-ike (心字池), a pond shaped like the Chinese character for ‘heart’ or ‘mind’. There is also a dry waterfall, a tea house and a small stream with a 10m waterfall that feeds the pond. For 500 Yen, you can have tea and Japanese sweets in the tea house.

In autumn, when the roses are flowering (mid-October to late November), and the Japanese maples (mid-November to early December) show off their colorful foliage, the garden is especially delightful. But also in spring (late April to mid-May), the azaleas and the rose’s first flowers are in full bloom.

Contents:
Introduction
History
Buildings
The Gardens
Other Highlights
Anikas Impressions
Around Kyu-Furukawa Teien

14 pages full of information about the Kyu-Furukawa Garden
35 pictures of the gardens

PDF 14MB
mobi 23MB

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Directions

How to get there
The garden is 15 minutes by foot from the Komagome station (駒込駅, JR Yamanote line, Nanboku subway line). From the station, walk in northern direction.

Another option is to take the Keihin-Tohoku line to Kami-Nakazato (上中里) and walk towards the south.

Address
JP: 東京都北区西ヶ原 1-27-39
EN: 1-27-39 Nishigahara, Kita-ku, Tokyo

Telephone
03-3910-0394

Opening hours
9am – 5pm (last entrance at 4:30)

Closed around New Year between December 29th and January 1st.

Admission
150 Yen