Auspicious plants in Japanese Gardens(縁起の良い植物)

There are various plants all over the world with special meanings.
Like lily stands for purity or is a flower, that is used to honor the deceased, or daisy stands for innocence and loyal love.

In Japan, there are plants with auspicious meanings too. They are called “Engi no ii” plants 縁起の良い as a sign of luck or a good omen.

How this plants got their particular meaning, how they are used and why you should plant them in your garden, you will find in our eBook.

Contents:
  • Introduction
  • Japanese “fuusui”
  • Plants:
  • Heavenly Bamboo
  • Hiiragi
  • Japanese Laurel
  • Japanese Apricot
  • Pagoda Tree
  • Satsuki Azalea
  • Spirea
  • Bottlebrush
  • Crape Myrtle
  • Sarcandra
  • Bitter Orange
  • Rhododendron
  • Camellia
  • Christmas Berry
  • Notes


11 pages with lots of information about the origin of Japanese flower’s names, their meaning and various descriptions of Japanese traditions.
PDF 119MB
mobi 19MB

  The eBook is delivered as PDF.

  Feel free to pin these pictures to your Pinterest board:

Customer’s Voice

“Auspicious plants in the garden”. The title alone had me intrigued from the beginning. This e-book explains very clearly how plants used in Japanese gardens got their auspicious meanings; what they represent if you like and why you should plant them in your garden.
The layout of the book is straight forward and easy to follow. I love how both the Japanese and English names are given for each plant. The example pictures representing each plant are beautifully shot and are taken in a number of different settings.
I feel people who are new to Japanese gardens and those who are more familiar with the plants used would both gain a great deal of knowledge from this e-book. A thoroughly enjoyable read and something I know I’ll be referring back to from time to time.

K.Y.

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  • Bamboo in the Japanese garden

Bamboo in the Japanese garden(竹と笹)

In Japan, you can encounter bamboo everywhere – In the mountains, near rivers, in strolling gardens, tea gardens and private residences. Timber bamboo is used to build houses, roofs, scaffolding, windows, blinds, and fences. Whether it be chopsticks, brooms, flutes, brushes, fans or the most fragile tea scoop – bamboo products are part of the everyday Japanese life.

The plants are equally fascinating – some bamboo varieties need not less than 1 year to reach their full height, one can literally watch them grow! The bamboo shoots are already the same diameter as the later culm and have all the parts complete when they break through the soil. Bamboos can flower as infrequently as every 50 years – some varieties like the Madake flower do so at the same time all over the world!

The slender, erect culms, their cool green color and the sound of the wind in the leaves high above the garden visitor’s head are an integral part of the Japanese garden culture. In this eBook, we want to introduce the most common bamboo varieties and show if and how they can be grown in other climates outside of Japan.

Contents of the eBook
  • Introduction
  • Low growing bamboo
  •   – Azumane-zasa
  •   – Kuma-zasa
  • Medium height bamboo
  •   – Tōchiku
  • Tall growing bamboo
  •   – Mōsō-chiku
  •   – Madake
  •   – Hachiku
  •   – Kuro-chiku
  •   – Kikko-chiku


11 pages packed with 42 stunning pictures of Japanese bamboo

The eBook is delivered as PDF.

Feel free to pin these pictures to your Pinterest board:

Moss in the Japanese Garden(苔)

Moss is one of the signature plants of Japanese gardens. Given the right conditions, it can cover large areas in a garden, it grows on stone lanterns, trees, garden stones. The Japanese climate fits perfectly to the plant’s needs: Japan is surrounded by the sea, which provides a general humid climate in spring, summer, and autumn. Between mid-June and early July, the rainy season drenches the naturally acidic soil.

The reason moss grows on nearly every available surface is in its biological structure. If the air humidity is 80% or higher, the leaves are able to absorb humidity and nutrients directly from the air. So what looks like roots are actually the plant’s holdfast. Moss prefers a nutrient-poor soil, too many nutrients can damage the plant. That is why it thrives in places where flowering plants have a hard time to survive. Moss is also an air cleaner. It absorbs pollutants like nitrates and ammonia.

Although Japan has a long rain season, rain isn’t actually necessary for moss to thrive. More important than the average annual rainfall is the air humidity. And even without rain, moss can also survive periods of drought. Although the leaves may seem dead, the plant is still alive and the leaves will return to their green color after watering.

Contents of the eBook
    • Moss in Japanese gardens
    • Introduction
    • Koke – Mosses and liverworts
    • Moss
    • Sugi-goke
    • Ōsugi-goke
    • Haihiba-goke
    • Kotsubo-goke
    • Hai-goke
    • Mizu-goke
    • Suna-goke
    • Zeni-goke
    • Ja-goke
 
    • Famous moss gardens
    • Saihō-ji aka Koke-dera, the moss temple in Kyoto (西芳寺、苔寺)
    • Gyokudo Art Museum, Mitake, Tokyo (玉堂美術館)
    • Nezu Art Museum, Tokyo (根津美術館)
    • Hakone Museum of Art, Hakone (箱根美術館)
 
  • Establishing moss in your garden
  • Moss Maintenance


18 pages 45 beautiful moss pictures

The eBook is delivered as PDF.

Feel free to pin these pictures to your Pinterest board:


Moss in the Japanese Garden Trailer
Watch the Moss trailer here.

Customer’s Voice

This is a fascinating little book. I love visiting temples but my kids hate them so I don’t go very often. When I do go I just love the mossy sections so when I saw this book I decided to read it.

I had no idea there were so many varieties of moss and that it can grow in such varied conditions. To be honest I thought moss was some kind of naturally occurring thing but I’ve since learned it can be planted in the same manner as any other plant. I’m contemplating growing some moss in my own garden now!

The book is an easy but interesting read. Very detailed and clear photographs. Great explanations of the names in English and Japanese as well as the botanical names will make it easy to find these at my local garden centre.

I’m planning a trip to Kyoto later this month so will be looking to see which other books I can read. The gardens are most definitely my favourite part of a temple visit.

J.M.

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  • Plants in the Japanese Garden Vol. 1

Plants in the Japanese Garden Vol. 1(日本庭園 植物 Vol.1)

Plants are an integral element of Japanese gardens. In this first volume, we want to introduce some of the most common plants used in gardens in Japan.


Not all of them find their place in what we call traditional Japanese gardens but all of them are important plants in Japanese cityscapes.


Contents of the book

  • Introduction
  • Explanation to plant symbols and USDA Hardiness
  • Trees
  •   – 7 different trees
  • Shrubs
  •   – 15 kinds of shrubs
  • Perennials & Bulbs
  •   – 15 colorful perennials and bulbs
  • Bamboo & Moss
  •   – 5 mosses and 4 types of bamboo
  • Ferns
  •   – 6 ferns
  • Glossary
  • Credits


28 pages 57 pictures of plants


The eBook is delivered as PDF.


Feel free to pin these pictures to your Pinterest board:

Auspicious plants in Japanese Gardens  (縁起の良い植物)

There are various plants all over the world with special meanings.
Like lily stands for purity or is a flower, that is used to honor the deceased, or daisy stands for innocence and loyal love.

In Japan, there are plants with auspicious meanings too.
They are called “Engi no ii” plants 縁起の良い as a sign of luck or a good omen.

How this plants got their particular meaning, how they are used and why you should plant them in your garden, you will find in our eBook.

Contents:
Introduction
Japanese “fuusui”

Heavenly Bamboo
Hiiragi
Japanese Laurel
Japanese Apricot
Pagoda Tree
Satsuki Azalea
Spirea
Bottlebrush
Crape Myrtle
Sarcandra
Bitter Orange
Rhododendron
Camellia
Christmas Berry

Notes

11 pages with lots of information about the origin of Japanese flower’s names, their meaning and various descriptions of Japanese traditions.
PDF 119MB
mobi 19MB

The eBook is delivered as PDF and mobi.

Feel free to pin these pictures to your Pinterest board:

  •  Click to view details

Customer’s Voice

“Auspicious plants in the garden”. The title alone had me intrigued from the beginning. This e-book explains very clearly how plants used in Japanese gardens got their auspicious meanings; what they represent if you like and why you should plant them in your garden.
The layout of the book is straight forward and easy to follow. I love how both the Japanese and English names are given for each plant. The example pictures representing each plant are beautifully shot and are taken in a number of different settings.
I feel people who are new to Japanese gardens and those who are more familiar with the plants used would both gain a great deal of knowledge from this e-book. A thoroughly enjoyable read and something I know I’ll be referring back to from time to time.
K.Y.