Kajū-ji  (勧修寺)

Kajū-ji、sometimes pronounced as Kanshu-ji, is the head temple of the Yamashina school of Shingon Buddhism. It was founded in year 900 (Heian period) by the emperor Daigo.

The garden has a large island pond with a great number of water lilies, iris and lotus. It is said that the ice of this pond had been collected on January 2nd of every year to be send to the Imperial Palace. Another feature of the garden is an uncommonly shaped stone lantern.

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Directions

How to get there
From Kyoto station, take the Tokaido/Sanyo line from platform 11 or 12 towards Omishiotsu. Get off the train after 5 minutes at the first stop Yamashina (山科) and change to the Tozai line towards Rokujizo (六地蔵). After 3 stops (6 minutes), you will arrive at Ono station (小野). From there, walk west, cross the river and you will get to the temple within 7 minutes.

Opening times
9am – 4pm

Admission
400 Yen

Address
京都府京都市山科区勧修寺仁王堂町27-6

Namikawa-ke  (並河家)

Nowadays, the Namikawa residence is a museum of Cloisonné objects by the artist Namikawa. He used to live and work in this house. Because he became internationally successful after exhibiting at the World Fair in Paris in 1878 and 1889, he often had foreign guests staying at his house. For that reason, he built the sliding doors higher than usual and also used a lot of glass instead of paper screens. The garden of the Namikawa-ke is rather small, but well maintained and beautiful.

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Directions

How to get there
From Kyoto station, take the city bus number 100 and get off after 7 stops at Higashiyama-Sanjo (東山三条). Walk east for around 300 meters. After you cross the small stream, turn left and walk one block north. Teh museum should be on your left side.

Opening times
10am – 4:30pm

Admission
600 Yen

Address
東山区三条通北裏白川筋東入堀池町388 
Higashiyama-Ku, Sanjo-dori, Urajiro-Kawasuji Horiike-cho 388

Shōren-in  (青蓮院)

Shōren-in is one of the five Monzeki temples of the Tendai sect located in Kyoto.
Since its sixth head priest Dokaku, until the Meiji period every head priest was a member of the imperial family.
This temple, founded in the late Heian period, has two famous gardens.
It is said that the main garden with the ryūjin no ike pond was built by Soami during the Muromachi period.
The other garden, kirishima no niwa, was created by Kobori Enshū during the Edo period.
Although it is well known among foreign and local tourists alike, on visiting it gives a tranquil feeling.

Contents:
Introduction
History
Buildings
Gardens
Highlights
Anikas Impressions
Around Shōren-in

14 pages full of information about the temple
33 pictures of the gardens

PDF 18MB
mobi 23MB

The eBook is delivered as PDF and mobi.

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Shōren-in Trailer
Watch the Shōren-in trailer here.

RJG presents: Shōren-in from Real Japanese Gardens on Vimeo.

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Directions

How to get there
10 min walk from Tozai Subway Line Higashiyama Station (東山駅) or Bus 206 to Chion-in mae (知恩院前)

Address
JP: 〒605-0035 京都府京都市,東山区粟田口三条坊町69−1
69-1 Awataguchi Sanjobo-cho Higashiyama-ku、Kyoto-shi

Admission
500 Yen

Opening hours
7am to 5pm

Murin-an  (無鄰菴)

Murin-an is a typical strolling garden of the Meiji period (1868-1912). It was built between 1894 and 1896 by Yamagata Aritomo, a Prime Minister of Meiji period Japan. As much as he loved the Japanese garden culture, he also had a deep interest in Western culture. The villa on the grounds of Murin-an has dark rooms, painted walls and a paneled ceiling and is a rare example of western style architecture.

The garden was realized by the Japanese master gardener Ogawa Jihee. The garden uses the eastern hills of Kyoto as a viewpoint, which let it appear as an extension of the mountain scenery. This technique is called shuzan – 主山. It has a small stream that is fed by the waters of Lake Biwa, Japan’s biggest lake. Large parts of the garden are lawn, probably an influence of English landscape gardens. The Japanese style villa has a tea room – why not sit down on the veranda and have a bowl of fresh Matcha green tea while admiring the garden?

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Directions

How to get there
Murin-an is in the neighborhood of Nanzen-ji and Heian-jingu shrine in eastern Kyoto. It is situated south of the Kyoto Zoo. Take the city bus number 5, 57, 32 or 100 to Doubutsu-en-mae (動物園前 – Kyoto Zoo). When you get off the bus, walk south and cross the bridge, then go to your left, in eastern direction, following the Niōmon-dori (仁王門通り). Before Niōmon makes a right turn, there is a really small street to your right. Turn into that street and you will find a Murin-an’s small entrance gate to your left.

Opening hours
Apr. – Sep. 9:00 ~ 6:00
Oct. – Mar. 9:00 ~ 5:00

Holidays:
December 29th – December 31st.

Admission
410 Yen
Will be raised to 600 Yen from October 1, 2019

Address
JP: 31 南禅寺草川町、左京区 京都市 京都府 606-8437
EN: 31 Kusakawa-cho, Nanzenji, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8437

Nijō Castle – Ninomaru  (二条城 二の丸庭園)

The Ninomaru gardens of the Nijō castle in Kyoto have been designed by garden master Kobori Enshu. The palace was built for the first Edo shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu in the early Edo period (1603-1868). There are numerous cherry and plum trees, which bloom between March and April.

The garden has a large pond with three islands that symbolize Horai-San, and the crane and turtle mountains of the Taoist mythology.

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Directions

How to get there
From Kyoto station, take city bus number 9 to Nijo-jo mae (二条城前) – it should take around 16 minutes.

Address
JP: 〒604-8301 京都市中京区二条通堀川西入二条城町541番地
EN: 541 Nijojocho, Nakagyo Ward, Kyoto, Kyoto Prefecture 604-8301

Opening times
8:45am to 5pm (last entry at 4pm)

Closed between Dec. 26th and January 4st,
and every Tuesday in January, July, August and December.

Admission
600 yen

Sanbō-in (Daigō-ji)   (醍醐寺 三宝院)

Sanbō-in is a temple of the Shingon school of Buddhism. It is a sub-temple of Daigō-ji and especially known for its beautiful garden.
The temple was built in 1115 (Heian period) and rebuilt in 1598 (Azuchi-Momoyama period). The garden is a large pond garden, with numerous stones and famous cherry and plum trees.

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Directions

How to get there
From Kyoto station, take the Nara line towards Nara and get off after two stops at Rokujizo station. Change here for the Tozai line towards Uzumases Tenjingawa. After 4 minutes and two stops you will arrive at Daigo station. From there, either take a taxi to the temple (1.1km) or walk in westwards direction (15 minutes).

Opening times
March-November: 9am – 5pm
December-February: 9am – 4pm
Last entry: 30 minutes before closing date.

Admission
600 yen

Address
22 Daigohigashiojicho, Fushimi Ward, Kyoto, Kyoto Prefecture 601-1325

Kōsei-in  (廣誠院)

A small temple of the Rinzai school of Buddhism. The interior has wonderful Fusuma-e (screen paintings) and a view on the walled garden.

Taking pictures is not allowed inside the temple, but the garden is definitely worth a visit.

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Directions

How to get there
Take the Kyoto city bus 205 from Kyoto station and get off at the eighth bus stop Shiyakusho-mae (京都市役所前). It takes about 18 minutes.

A faster alternative would be to take the Karasuma subway until Karasuma-oike (烏丸御池) and change to the Tozai line. After two stops, get off at Kyoto Shiyakusho-mae.

From Kyoto Shiyakusho-mae, walk a block in northern direction, and after you have passed the Hotel Okura, turn right.

Admission
Only open in early November, the entrance fee is 800 Yen.

Sokushū-in (Tōfuku-ji)  (即宗院)

Sokushu-in is a small sub-temple of Tōfuku-ji. It only open in autumn, which is also the best time to visit it. Unknown to most visitors and a little off the main temples, it is a great place to escape the masses of tourists visiting in Tōfuku-ji in autumn.

The temple was built as a villa for a member of the Fujiwara clan in 1196. In 1387, the temple was founded on the grounds of the old villa.

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Directions

How to get there
Take the Nara line from Kyoto station towards Nara. Get off at the first stop, Tōfuku-ji, and walk in southern direction until you get to Tōfuku-ji.

Opening times
Only open on special days in autumn,
check this website for more information (Japanese only):
http://www.sokusyuin-sizensou.com/

Shūgaku-in Rikyū  (修学院離宮)

Shūgaku-in Rikyū is an exception among Kyoto’s imperial gardens. There is not only one garden on its grounds, but three separate gardens. The gardens are connected by gravel paths, which lead through vegetable patches and rice fields. It also never was the official residence of a member of the imperial family – Emperor Gomizuno-o (1596-1680) had built these gardens as a private retreat in the outskirts of Kyoto, on the foot of the Higashiyama, the eastern hills. Additionally, this garden may be the best example of the use of “borrowed landscape”- Shakkei (借景) in Japan.

The retired emperor Gomizuno-o (後水尾天皇) built the gardens between 1653 and 1655 with the financial support of the shogun. More than 600 years earlier, in the Heian period (794-1185), a temple called “Shūgaku-in” stood on this site. Without any actual political power, the emperor had lots of time on his hands to dedicate himself to the study of fine arts, poetry, architecture and design. It is therefore believed that most of the design was his own work. He has already participated in the design process of his official retirement residence Sentō Gosho in 1629, whose main designer was garden master Kobori Enshū. Enshū passed away in 1647, but his influence on emperor Gomizuno-o is still visible in the design of the Shūgaku-in Rikyū gardens.

There are three gardens: The lower garden, the middle garden and the upper garden.
All of them have their own characteristics, but most visitors agree that the upper garden is the most spectacular one – especially in autumn, when the trees of the surrounding mountains turn into a vibrant red, yellow and orange.

Access to the garden is only granted to guided tours (free of charge). You can apply for a tour at the Imperial Household Agency Office in Kyoto (3 Kyoto-gyoen, Kamigyo-ku, Kyoto, 602-8611) or on their website: http://sankan.kunaicho.go.jp/english/guide/shugakuin.html .
A contingent of tickets is available each day from 11 am on a first come first-served basis.

This is eBook is about the Japanese stone lanterns (Ishi-doro) of the Shūgaku-in Rikyū gardens.

Content
Shugaku-in Rikyu
Lower Garden
Stone lantern – Ishi-dōrō (石燈籠)
Kimono-sleeve lantern – Sode-gata tōrō (袖形燈籠)
Alligator’s mouth lantern – Wanikuchi dōrō (鰐口燈籠)
Korean stone lantern – Chōsen-dōrō (朝鮮燈籠)
Middle Garden
Christian lantern – Kirishitan-dōrō (キリシタン燈籠)
Oribe stone lantern (織部燈籠)
Upper Garden
Mountain temple lantern – Yamadera-dōrō (山寺燈籠)
Waterfall viewing lantern – Takimi-dōrō (滝見燈籠)

5 pages with
13 pictures of the stone lanterns of the Shugaku-in Rikyu garden

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Directions

How to get there

The easiest way to get to the Shūgaku-in Imperial Villa is to take the city bus number 5 to the stop Shūgaku-in Rikyu Michi. From there, walk 15 min in eastern direction.

Admission
Free
Only adults over 18 can apply for the tour.

Address
JP: 〒 606-8052 京都府京都市左京区修学院藪添
EN: Shugakuin Yabusoe, Sakyo Ward, Kyoto, Kyoto Prefecture 606-8052

Telephone
+81-75-211-1215

Hasedera  (長谷寺)

A mystical kannon statue, hydrangea at full bloom, a modern dry landscape garden. This is the Hasedera temple in Kamakura, the probably second oldest temple in the city, also simply known as Hase kannon. It is the 4th station of the thirty-three Kannon pilgrimage in the Kanto area.

The Hasedera temple is most famous for its eleven-headed Kannon statue, which is over 9 meters high. The temple is of the Jodo school of Buddhism and is said to have been founded in 736.

The Hasedera garden and Hojo-ike pond can be found just behind the temple entrance while it is advised to climb until the top of the mountain to have a stunning view over the ocean.

Contents

Introduction
History of the temple
Buildings
-Kannon-dō
-Amida-dō
-Jizo-dō
-Benten-dō/ Benten-kutsu
-Daikoku-dō
-Inari-sha
-Kyōzō
-Shoin
Gardens
-Go-en Garden
-Mossy Pond Garden
-Hojo Pond Garden
Plants in the Garden
The Kannon Museum
Events
Restaurants & Cafes
Anika’s Impressions
Access & Gerneral Information
Around Hasedera

14 pages
31 pictures
17 MB / 24MB
2019

eBook will be delivered as pdf and mobi

 
 

Hasedera Video

Watch the Hasedera video here.

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Directions

How to get there
You can take a bus or the train from Kamakura station to get to Hase.
Kamakura bus number 4 (鎌4) takes you to the Hase-Kannon (長谷観音) bus stop in 7 minutes.

If you prefer to go by train, take Enoshima-Dentetsu line and get off at the third stop Hase station (長谷). It should take only 5 minutes.

If you are visiting the Great Buddha (Daibutsu, at Kotoku-in) in Hase, the temple is just a 10 minute walk away.

Opening times
March – September: 8am – 5pm
Otober – February: 8am – 4:30pm

Admission
300 yen

Address
11-2, Hase 3-chome, Kamakura, Kanagawa 248-0016